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Pakuwon City, Letters from the East, puts a life-time of travelling into perspective offering a comparative value of life in the present to life in the past without being nostalgic or maudlin. The author’s simplicity, honesty and wry sense of humour combine for a credible and incredible story that makes readers think about how decisions propel us forward into directions that define our lives. From Mexico to Europe and Asia, this is more than a travelogue: It’s a guide to living and learning.

This is a time when world travel seemed safer and the world provided a canvas for enlightenment. It is a story of growth, from naivete to profound awareness. Colourful characters from prostitutes in Mexico to an inarticulate American FBI informant posing as a writer to a middle-aged English woman who leaves her husband and children to follow a suave Latin to Franco’s Spain come to life with Winsor’s distinctive voice. This is a book that will make you smile and frown while you look back at the adventures of your own life.

Ricker Winsor casts a clear gaze across the landscapes, encounters, and passions of his life. Written with honesty and dry wit, Mr. Winsor offers the reader glimpses of an original sensibility that makes this much more than a typical “American abroad” narrative. This is the work, too. of a painter who looks deeply into what he sees, a musician who also knows how to listen to the speech and sounds around him anywhere.

The book Pakuwon City: Letters from the East provides insights into the life and mind of a fascinating and talented writer.

Winsor has lived the life most “Walter Mittys” only dream of … and has written a book of beautiful prose (maybe it’s the music or art in his background) that reveals many of his life adventures. It’s a little sexy, a bit humorous, a book that took me to places in the world way too exotic (and dangerous) for me to go. A fresh voice, a book that’s way too short and a good read.

In his later years, Winsor remembers with startling insight the high adventure, early loves and insane escapades of his youth in Spain and Morocco in the 60’s and his coming of age and artistic maturity all over the world. He is a present-day Patrick Leigh Fermor, only with guts and humor. This book is poetry – it reads like a movie.

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